Word-Of-the-Week #672: Tolerate

June 22, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Tolerate – put up with something or somebody unpleasant.

How often do you find yourself putting up with something or somebody being unpleasant? How do you deal with it? Do you retreat or address the situation or person?

This week’s WOW comes from long time subscriber Kim regarding a past WOW on Respect. She wrote, “This week’s word really hit home. I work in a small office and there is a young lady that pretty much offends everyone because she is disrespectful.

She is pleasant enough most of the time, but she is condescending and if anything is wrong, it is never any fault of her own. People have to work out a way to avoid dealing with her, instead of just doing their work and engaging in a normal way.

It IS exhausting, and frustrating that everyone feels like they have to give in to her because she has no shame, and they want to avoid a confrontation. She even jokes sometimes at how much of a bitch she is, which isn’t funny to anyone.

When confronted though, just like a school yard bully, she backs down, but the energy to do that is taxing. The easiest way I have found is to address it as it comes. I have worked with her for 6 years, and within the first few months of her employment, I told her that I wasn’t going to engage in immature spats of “WHATever” and “FINE, we’ll do it YOUR way” and other such nonsensical responses.

I couldn’t stand the eye rolling, and her not making eye contact when having a conversation, so I asked my employer to remove me from joint projects with her. He wasn’t happy, but as we have downsized and he finds himself having to do more and more projects with her, he calls me and complains about her attitude and disrespect.

It is a real shame as she is intelligent, but people smile and tolerate her, mostly now out of pity, because she is 31 years old now, and there really isn’t anything endearing about her.

She is a hard worker and very thorough, too bad it isn’t nice to work with her because she doesn’t have: Respect – to show consideration for; treat courteously or kindly.”

All I can say is the older I get the less and less I tolerate. Life is just too short! This week’s focus is on finding a way to deal with somebody unpleasant so they don’t make your life unpleasant. Are you able to distance yourself from and ignore disrespectful people? Have you ever tried to “kill someone with kindness?” The “Shock Factor” works wonders and one I have used a lot. And lastly it is easier to change your behavior than to try and change someone else’s behavior!

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Word-Of-the-Week #671: Intuition

June 15, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Intuition a gut feeling of knowing without ever having any idea why you know it.

Have you ever had a feeling that you knew something but didn’t know how or why? Do you have the courage to follow your heart and your intuition?

This is the follow up to “How To Be Successful In Life: 13 Tips From The World’s Most Successful People.” Kara Heissman has seen over the years how the quality of people’s lives are reduced by their inability to find solutions for certain difficulties in their lives.

There are a lot of tips and strategies out there on how to be successful in life, but I am still a firm believer that there is no better way to succeed than to follow that footsteps of those who have already done so. Here are her other 7 success tips from some of the world’s most successful and renowned people:

7. Avoid conflicts.

From Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of America: “The most important single ingredient in the formula of success is knowing how to get along with people.”

8. Don’t be afraid of introducing new ideas.

From Mark Twain, Famed Author: “A person with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds.”

9. Believe in your capacity to succeed.

From Walter Disney, Founder of Walt Disney Company: “If you can dream it, you can do it.”

10. Always maintain a positive mental attitude.

From Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President of America: “Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong mental attitude.”

11. Don’t let discouragement stop you from pressing on.

From Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of America: “Let no feeling of discouragement prey upon you, and in the end you are sure to succeed.”

12. Be willing to work hard.

From JC Penny, Founder of JC Penney Inc.: “Unless you are willing to drench yourself in your work beyond the capacity of the average man, you are just not cut out for positions at the top.”

13. Be brave enough to follow your intuition.

From Steve Jobs, Co-founder of Apple Inc.: “Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

This week’s focus is on intuition. How often have you had a gut feeling but not sure how or why? How often has it served you well? How would it feel to not question and just follow your gut feelings?

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Word-Of-the-Week #670: Succeed

June 8, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Succeed to accomplish something desired or intended.

How many times have you accomplished something you desired or intended? How comfortable are you setting BIG lofty goals? How well do you handle failure – freeze up or keep going?

Kara Heissman has seen over the years how the quality of people’s lives are reduced by their inability to find solutions for certain difficulties in their lives. The next 2 WOW’s feature “How To Be Successful In Life: 13 Tips From The World’s Most Successful People.”

“No matter how old you are, where you’re from or what you do for a living, we all share something in common—a desire to be successful. Each person’s definition of success is different, however, as some may define success as being a loving and faithful spouse or a caring and responsible parent, while most people would equate success with wealth, fame, and power.

We all want to achieve success so we could live a comfortable life—have financial freedom, drive a nice car, and live in a beautiful house. However, although success can be achieved, it does not come easy.

There are a lot of tips and strategies out there on how to be successful in life, but I am still a firm believer that there is no better way to succeed than to follow that footsteps of those who have already done so. Here are her first 6 success tips from some of the world’s most successful and renowned people:

1. Think big.

From Michelangelo Buonarroti, Great Renaissance Artist: “The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short; but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark.”

2. Find what you love to do and do it.

From Oprah Winfrey, Media Mogul: “You know you are on the road to success if you would do your job and not be paid for it.”

3. Learn how to balance life.

From Phil Knight, CEO of Nike Inc.: “There is an immutable conflict at work in life and in business, a constant battle between peace and chaos. Neither can be mastered, but both can be influenced. How you go about that is the key to success.”

4. Do not be afraid of failure.

From Henry Ford, Founder of Ford Motors: “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.”

5. Have an unwavering resolution to succeed.

From Colonel Sanders, Founder of KFC: “I made a resolve then that I was going to amount to something if I could. And no hours, nor amount of labor, nor amount of money would deter me from giving the best that there was in me. And I have done that ever since, and I win by it. I know.”

6. Be a man of action.

From Leonardo da Vinci, Renaissance Genius:“It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.”

This week’s focus is helping you to succeed. Do you love the life you have created? Are you able to keep your work and home life balanced? Are you waiting for things to happen or are you making things happen? Will you do whatever it takes to succeed?

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Word-Of-the-Week #669: Mistake

June 1, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Mistake the result of defective judgment, deficient knowledge, or carelessness.

Have you ever had a lapse in judgment that caused you to lose a promotion, a raise, or your job? Have you ever been accused of “resting on your laurels?” Do you have a tendency to complain about your work situation?

This is the sequel to Travis Bradberry’s article “Career killersEven small mistakes can be costly in the workplace.” To recap he wrote, “Little things can add up over time and undermine your career just as much as one huge lapse in judgment. Stay aware of these blunders before they creep up and kill your career:

  • Having an inflatable ego – Did you ever work with someone who had a string of successes and started thinking that he or she was a star? Success is great. It definitely boosts your career, and it feels really good. The problems start once you let it go to your head. You start thinking that success is going to last forever and that you’re entitled to it.

Never, ever be content with resting on your laurels.

  • Losing sight of the big picture – It’s easy to become head-down busy, working so hard on what’s right in front of you that you lose sight of the big picture. But smart people learn how to keep this in check by weighing their daily priorities against a carefully calculated goal.

It’s not that they don’t care about small-scale work; they just have the discipline and perspective to adjust course as necessary.

  • Negativity – Sometimes when you’re feeling negative and down, your mood can leak out and affect other people. People who spread negativity through their department and complain about the work or other people complicate things for everyone else.

If people always have to tiptoe around you so as not to risk poking the bear, they are unlikely to be willing to do it for very long.

  • Low emotional intelligence – Everyone knows that you can get fired for being unable or unwilling to play nicely with others, but what trips up a lot of people is having a poorly developed poker face. If everyone can tell when you’re bored or irritated or that you think something a colleague says is stupid, this will catch up with you.

Emotional outbursts, belittling others, shutting co-workers down when they speak, low self-awareness and just generally being difficult are other ways that a lack of emotional intelligence will do great harm to your career.

  • Playing politics – Working hard to build strong work relationships is very different from instigating conflict, choosing sides, undermining colleagues, spreading rumors and all of the other things that fall under the umbrella of “playing politics.” If you find yourself feeling embarrassed about any of your tactics, you likely are playing politics.

Stick to strategies you’d be proud to discuss in front of your colleagues.

This week’s focus is about not making mistakes. How good are you at weighing your daily priorities against carefully calculated goals? How easy are you to work with? Do you work hard at building strong work relationships?

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Word-Of-the-Week #668: Complacent

May 25, 2017 by · Comments Off on Word-Of-the-Week #668: Complacent 

Complacent – satisfied with the current situation and unconcerned with changing it, often to the point of smugness.

Are you currently working in the job of your dreams? How long has it been since you proactively learned a new skill? How easily are you able to adapt to changes?

Travis Bradberry is the co-author of “Emotional Intelligence 2.0” and co-founder of TalentSmart, a San Diego provider of emotional intelligence tests and training. “Career killersEven small mistakes can be costly in the workplace” is this week’s focus. Travis writes,

“There are many things that can kill people’s careers, and even small mistakes often carry serious consequences down the road. We usually only hear about the most egregious examples, but most people don’t go down in a blaze of glory; they kill their careers in subtle, decidedly undramatic ways. A recent survey by VitalSmarts found that 83 percent of respondents had seen someone make a blunder that had catastrophic results for their career, reputation or business, and 69 percent acknowledged they had done something that damaged their careers. Of those:

  • 31 percent said it cost them a promotion, a raise or a job.
  • 27 percent said it damaged a working relationship.
  • 11 percent said it destroyed their reputation.

Little things can add up over time and undermine your career just as much as one huge lapse in judgment. Stay aware of these blunders before they creep up and kill your career:

  • Over-promising and under-delivering – It’s tempting to promise the moon to your colleagues and your clients, especially when you’re hardworking and believe that you can do it. The problem is that there’s no point in creating additional pressure that can make you look bad. If you promise to do something ridiculously fast and you miss the deadline by a little bit, you’ll likely think that you did a good job because you still delivered quickly. But the moment you promise something to someone, they expect exactly that.

You end up looking terrible when you fall short, which is a shame, because you could have done the same quality work in the same amount of time with great results if you’d just set up realistic expectations from the beginning.

  • Complacency – How long has it been since you proactively learned a new skill, reached out to your networking contacts or even polished your resume? If you can’t remember, you might have become a bit complacent, and complacency is a real career killer.

If you’re always too busy to learn something new or to expand your network, you’ve got your priorities mixed up. However, if you make continuous growth and development a priority, you’ll be ready for whatever comes your way.

  • Fear of change – Fear of change is complacency’s evil twin. It actively works to keep things the same. I’m sure you’ve seen this one first hand at work when someone uttered the dreaded words, “But we’ve always done it this way.”

Things are changing too fast these days to latch on tightly to the status quo, and the costs of doing so can be huge. Surveys show that managers find that the most successful employees are the ones who can adapt to the changing workplace.”

This week’s focus is to not be complacent. How often do you reach out to your networking contacts? When was the last time you polished your resume? Are you ready to tackle whatever comes your way each day?

Stay tuned – next week will feature 5 more Career Killers!

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